Saturday, April 26, 2008

Not by bread alone

Many real-life Treehouse discussions lately have centred around food. Both in what-are-we-to-eat terms (how should we or even can we accommodate certain food sensitivities and/or allergies?) and in how-are-we-to-afford-it terms; and, maybe more importantly, we have to see this in the larger context of mounting world hunger and rising prices. Every time I hear about grain prices going up, I think of Larry Norman's "a piece of bread could buy a bag of gold."

I've linked to these comments by Edward Espe Brown in a previous post about food.

Remember this part?
"A group of us would eat sixteen, eighteen, twenty half slices of bread, the equivalent of eight to ten full slices, and this was not light and airy but homemade, chewy, dense bread, plus gobs of spread. And very few people gained weight. Perhaps all those calories got burned up in the frenzy to eat more, though I was working pretty long hours, too."
Maybe those monks were part Squirrel.

Sometimes thinking about cooking is a necessary distraction. The past season in the Treehouse has not been without its confusions and stresses, and sometimes working out a grocery list or blogging about a recipe is a safe and fairly undemanding thing to do. Jan Karon agreed with that in the last Mitford book: "Let Esther bake," Father Tim advised.

There are people out there who might begrudge even our blogging forays into the pleasures or details of what we eat. Surely there are bigger things to consider in this life.

But then I read this reminder from Ed:
"Come to your senses. It is not the things of this world, be they chocolate or brown rice, that lead you astray. Losing your way comes from giving no mind to what is present while chasing after imaginary pleasures which are illusive and unobtainable. To wake up is to know what is already yours."

3 comments:

Jacqueline said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jacqueline said...

I love Larry Norman songs! And I love the last quote you quoted. "Losing your way comes from giving no mind to what is present while chasing after imaginary pleasures which are illusive and unobtainable. To wake up is to know what is already yours." I need to give that some thought.

Marsha said...

Yesterday I made 5 meals that can be warmed up on busy days this week. I was thinking about the Abarba-criteria for an acceptable meal: gluten-free, milk-free, acid-free (no tomatoes or eggplant), low-fat, minimally meaty, nothing packaged, based on shopping the grocery store specials or what is in our freezer from past specials. I remember the ease with which my mother cooked - casseroles containing 1 can cream of mushroom soup, 1 c. mayo, cheddar cheese, pasta, meat, etc. Voila. Done so quickly!

You will figure this out, Mama Squirrel. But I clearly remember the agony of re-learning how to shop & cook when our families' allergies became apparent.

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