Monday, September 06, 2010

Jihad and jingoism...from The Globe and Mail to Wordsworth and Charlotte Mason

"But who shall parcel out
His intellect by geometric rules,
Split like a province into round and square?
Who knows the individual hour in which
His habits were first sown, even as a seed?
Who that shall point as with a wand and say
'This portion of the river of my mind
Came from yon fountain'? "
––William Wordsworth, "The Prelude,"
quoted in Charlotte Mason, School Education
"Because we remain human beings, despite the best efforts of our enemies to get past that fact, we can also visualize the pain and the suffering and the horror that are the essential parts of the bomber's objectifying obliteration. This intellectual leap, sadly, is the great strength of what Northrop Frye called the educated imagination. If we've learned to share the strong feelings of characters in War and Peace and Madame Bovary, how can we not also identify with the sufferings in our own time and place?"--John Allemang, "Can the liberal arts cure jihadists?", Globe and Mail, September 3, 2010
"The more educated among our 'Dominion' cousins complain that their young people have no background of history and as a consequence 'we are the people' is their master thought; they would face even the loss of Westminster Abbey without a qualm. What is it to them where great events have happened, great persons lived and moved? And, alas, this indifference to history is not confined to the Dominions; young people at home are equally indifferent, nor have their elders such stores of interest and information as should quicken children with the knowledge that always and everywhere there have been great parts to play and almost always great men to play those parts: that any day it may come to anyone to do some service of historical moment to the country. It is not too much to say that a rational well-considered patriotism depends on a pretty copious reading of history, and with this rational patriotism we desire our young people shall be informed rather than with the jingoism of the emotional patriot."--Charlotte Mason, Towards a Philosophy of Education (page 170)
"The great truth of democracy, at least when it's working well, isn't about the levels of turnout at the polling stations or the noise from the opposition benches when someone who calls himself the leader gets carried away with his own sense of power. What's much more fundamental to the 2,500-year-old experiment of people trying to rule themselves can be found in its basic sense of humanity – the ability, as University of Chicago philosopher Martha Nussbaum wrote in Not for Profit, “to see other people as human beings, not simply as objects.”"--John Allemang
""Our Lord," says this author, "reverenced whatever the learner had in him of his own, and was tender in fostering this native growth––. . . . Men, in His eyes, were not mere clay in the hands of the potter, matter to be moulded to shape. They were organic beings, each growing from within, with a life of his own––a personal life which was exceedingly precious in His and His Father's eyes––and He would foster this growth so that it might take after the highest type." (Pastor Pastorum, by H. Latham, M.A., page 6.)"--quoted in Charlotte Mason, School Education

4 comments:

Nancy said...

Excellent post. The CM "jingoism" quote is one I often use in my talks on citizenship. (I was going to write a post on that term alone!) I don't know Allemang, but will try to read more of him. Amazing how what Mason said continues to ring true today, even in relation to jihad.

Mama Squirrel said...

Hi Nancy, thanks for your comments! I enjoyed your co-op posts on Sage Parnassus, and also the one about the PMEU. Are you going to be involved with the events in Ancaster in October?

Nancy said...

I am very much looking forward to it! Does this mean we'll get to meet?

Mama Squirrel said...

Nancy, I will email you.

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